What Occupational Therapy means to us: Occupational Therapy Week 2022

This week, 7th to 13th November, is Occupational Therapy Week. And the theme of the campaign launched for 2022 is ‘Lift Up Your Everyday’.

With the pandemic and current worsening of the economic situation, there has been an impact on the nation’s health, as access to GP’s and hospital appointments are hard to come by.

Our role as Occupational Therapists are to help others help themselves. We here at Bursting with Potential support children and young people to do things they want to do, things they need to do, and also help them overcome challenges such as completing everyday tasks/activities in order for them to lead inclusive and fulfilling lives.

However, we recognise not everyone can access support. Many areas of health and social care are experiencing increased demand, with this demand expected to rise further still.

The aim of this campaign is to promote Occupational Therapists in the eyes of the public as health care experts, whose advice you can trust. This campaign also is meant to raise awareness of what Occupational Therapy is and allow those who may not know a lot about it, a chance to develop and grow their understanding of this practice.

And, one way we wanted to get involved was to focus on what Occupational Therapy means to us; our OT’s, our OTA’s, our Specialist Teacher, and even our admin team here at Bursting with Potential.

We asked each of our staff what Occupational Therapy means to them, and these were their individual responses:

Alison…

To me, Occupational Therapy means a collaboration between therapist and client to problem solve and find practical solutions and strategies to support the client to do the things they want or need to do, whether that be self-care, productivity (school or work), or leisure focused. I am on their team and work with them and their wider support network to empower them.

Linda…

Occupational Therapists work in many fields with people who have physical, social, and emotional challenges and who are aged across the life span. When I qualified as an OT a number of years ago the broadness of this was challenging and I tried several different areas – acute mental health, brain injury, neurological conditions- to see what suited the way I worked best. In the end I settled on paediatrics, the area I have now specialised in, but rather than not referring to my time spent in the other fields, it has added to the work I do with children-this is common to most OT’s. An OT sees the person and their life as a whole, not just focusing on one specific area and a broad knowledge base is always needed. OT’s are part of a team, involving other clinicians but most importantly the child and their family and work to support them to achieve what is valued by them. I feel that my OT knowledge also affects the way I view things ‘outside ‘of work – be it social, or in a cognitive way – an OT always sees the world through ‘Occupational Therapy’ glasses!

Sue…

Occupational Therapy means taking the time to identify and remove barriers that prevent children, young adults and adults reaching their potential in whatever area is important to them. 

Lisa…

To me, Occupational Therapy means the opportunity to make a huge difference in our clients lives, for both child and parent. Helping them to be the best versions of themselves through the interventions and therapy’s we offer and implement.

Vicki…

To me, Occupational Therapy means helping children, young people and their families overcome what challenges lay in their way and in turn make life better and easier. It’s about seeing the potential in every child and helping them achieve it.

Nisha…

To me, Occupational Therapy is working together with people to help them better understand themselves and support their daily lives.

Tim…

Occupational Therapy supports children, young people and adults who are experiencing physical and sensory difficulties in their daily lives, as a result of both seen and unseen disabilities.  It can help them and the people they interact with daily, to understand why they react in the way they do and how to ameliorate and minimise the anxiety and distress that individuals feel because they are not able to act or respond in a neurotypical or normal way.  It helps the people who care for them/teach them to adjust and adapt the environment they provide, their interactions and responses to individuals so as to enable them to achieve success, not failure, on a daily basis.

Jeremy…

Occupational Therapy is all about the use of daily activities with physical, emotional, or mental health difficulties. Occupational Therapy developed out of nursing; in I believe the 1930’s.

Emily…

For me, Occupational Therapy is the listening ear, the nurturing and helpful hand, and the toolbox of life skills and support in order to allow an individual, whoever they may be, to live their life to the fullest.

Jaxx…

What Occupational Therapy means to me, is someone who is there for someone who needs help and make a difference to people’s lives.

Want to learn more about what Occupational Therapy is? You can read our blog which discusses that here: https://www.burstingwithpotential.co.uk/an-occupational-focus-what-does-it-mean/

For more information on Occupational Therapy Week 2022, you can visit the Royal College of Occupational Therapists, by clicking this link: https://www.rcot.co.uk/occupational-therapy-week-2022

As always, if you have any other questions about what we do, or are seeking support, you can contact us via phone on 01733 223720 or email us at: office@burstingwithpotential.co.uk

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